Stories in Stone Blog Tour!

I recently read an excellent book – Stories in Stone: Travels Through Urban Geology by David B. Williams.  In his book, Williams takes an in-depth, historical look at stone and stone-faced buildings in cities around the US.  Given that I’ve been searching out fossils in stone buildings with my kids for years, this book was of immediate interest to me!

Williams does a fine job of tying history, architecture, and technology together to create an engaging narrative for each location he covers.  He doesn’t simply write about the stone and it’s properties, he includes what it took to acquire – harvest – that stone and get it to the building site.

Check out David’s blog and join him on his blog tour– schedule to follow.  When he gets to me on the 28th, we’ll be discussing the technology and transportation involved in acquiring and transporting the stone.  I’m looking forward to it!

Meanwhile you can catch him discussing other aspects of his book at the following sites on the following dates.  (Info taken from David’s site with a bit of modification.)

Tues Aug 18: Clastic Detritus, Brian Romans posted a review of Stories in Stone on August 17, followed by a Q&A on the 18th.

Wed Aug 19: A Daily Dose of Architecture. John Hill sent David links to a variety of buildings that use stone and asked for his commentary.

Fri Aug 21: The Tangled Nest.  David will write a post on Lyanda Lynn Haupt’s site to tie together their interest in being urban naturalists, a topic she writes about in her wonderful new book, The Crow Planet.

Mon Aug 24: Laelaps.  Geology Q&A and Book Review.

Wed Aug 26: Hear David’s interview with Michael Bradbury, the driving force behind the web site Real Science. During a 45-minute-long interview they chat about deep time, granite countertops and radiation, and whether science influences the use of building stone.

Fri Aug 28: Here!  To answer some questions about technology and transportation of stone!

Mon Aug 31: Across the Atlantic (virtually) to Michael Welland’s, Through the Sandglass. A fellow author, Michael has written the well-received Sand: The Never Ending Story.

Wed Sep 2: Biking and stone on Tom Furtwangler’s colorful and ever enjoyable bikejuju.

Enjoy the tour!


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Comments

  1. >Gina,Thanks kindly for your post about the book and my blog tour. I, too, am looking forward to our conversation and hope that we can also involve other Synthesis readers in discussing Stories in Stone.Cheers,David

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