Category: Fluid Dynamics

Extreme Condition Marine Tech

Tomorrow’s maritime technology must be able to handle extreme conditions during Arctic and deep-water operations. A new research centre designed to develop these technologies holds promise for Norwegian industry. | GEMINI

Satellites and Airliners

It’s difficult to imagine that a Boeing 777 could disappear. It’s 200 feet long, 199 feet from wing tip to wing tip, and has a cabin that’s a bit over 19 feet wide. It carries up to 440 people, and the 200-ER also carriers nearly 15,000 gallons of additional fuel. What that all means is […]

Jellyfish Propulsion

Coming soon – an interview with Brad Gemmell – a researcher who discovered the secret to the propulsive power of jellyfish!

Reynolds Number

This video does an outstanding job of making the Reynolds Number meaningful. More about the use of the Reynolds Number in scale model testing in future posts!

Jellyfish Power!

This is the first post in a series on jellyfish. It explores the way jellyfish move through deep water. Sometimes it appears that jellyfish simply float and move with the water in the waves. Other times it seems that the wind blowing across the surface of the water is pushing the jellyfish along the surface.

Pop! The Science of Bubbles

In this BBC presentation, Physicist Dr Helen Czerski takes us on an amazing journey into the science of bubbles. Bubbles may seem to be just fun toys, but they are also powerful tools that push back the boundaries of science. From the way animals behave to the way drinks taste, Dr Czerski shows how bubbles […]

Loop de Loop Doodle

Here’s to the intrepids! The people who not only wonder why something isn’t so, but set out to make it so. The first loop de loop was performed by Petr Nesterov on Sep 9, 1913 in Belarus, Russia, Ukraine. It’s hard to believe that this is all about fluids in motion!

No Jetson Future?

Say it isn’t say! Say it can’t be true that the vision of personal flying cars is about to be supplanted by —- drones delivering pizza! Talk about your cruel and twisted outcomes! When I was a kid, we were often asked to envision the future. Our dreams always included flying cars or personal flying craft of […]

Tsiolkovsky Doodle

More about Tsiolkovsky: Rocket Men: Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky Tsiolkovsky: Sixteen Stages of Space Exploration Science Fiction and Science

Rocket Men: Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky

Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky was born in Russia in 1857. The fifth of eighteen children, Tsiolkovsky first imagined a place without gravity when he was 8. It was a small hydrogen-filled ballon that rose to the ceiling each time he let it go that excited his imagination. Tsiolkovsky’s mother taught him to read and write. Before […]

Tsiolkovsky: Sixteen Stages of Space Exploration

Russian Rocketman Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky, truly a “Citizen of the Universe,” introduced these Sixteen Stages of Space Exploration in 1926. He believed that these incremental steps would bring man into space and allow him to thrive: Design of rocket-propelled airplanes with wings. Progressively increasing the speeds and altitudes reached with these airplanes.  

Ueli Gegenschatz: Extreme Wingsuit Flying

Ueli Gegenschatz takes everything we know about aerodynamics and puts it all into a series of brilliant extreme sports experiences in the pursuit of his dream of human flight. You can view this video and think about lift, drag, thrust, and weight, but chances are you’ll be too busy wishing you were there with him! […]

Did Jon Lester Cheat?

The truth of the matter is that surreptitiously altering the surface of the ball is sort of a time-worn tradition. Not a noble tradition, to be sure, but one that is viewed as much a part of the game of baseball as adjusting yourself or spitting tobacco juice.

Science Fiction and Science

Three men, working independently in three different countries, were at the forefront of liquid-fueled rocket development. Although all three did their work at the start of the 20th century, none of them knew of the others’ work in time to use that work in their investigations, yet all three had one important thing in common.

Garnerin Doodle

Today is a big day in fluid dynamic history! It’s the 216th anniversary of the first successful parachute jump. Andre-Jacques Garnerin (1769-1823) accomplished this feat by going aloft attached to the bottom of a hot air balloon. “I was on the point of cutting the cord that suspended me between heaven and earth… and measured […]

Buoyancy: Swim Bladders

We’ve all heard that a shark must swim continuously or sink. Do you know why? It’s because sharks do not have a swim bladder. “This gas-filled sac provides buoyancy and helps to keep the fish afloat by keeping it in a neutrally buoyant state.” When in this state, the fish is neither rising nor sinking in […]

Flash Floods and Lyons Colorado

 Lyons, Colorado – in Boulder County Colorado – was the site of horrific flooding over the past few days. The flooding was not just due to rising water levels in rivers and other bodies of water. The flooding was also due to flash flooding that resulted from the huge amount of rain that fell in […]

Wright Brothers 1903 Engine and Propellers

Read more about the Wright Brothers in Modeling Ships and Space Craft: The Science and Art of Mastering the Oceans and Sky by Gina Hagler — Part III – Scale Model Testing Begins, Chapter Nine – The Wright Brothers

Early Wind Tunnel Test

Here’s a video of a 1946 air tunnel test performed at Langley.

Nanotechnology: History

The capability to magnify objects by a factor of up to one million was made possible with the invention of the first transmission electron microscope (TEM) by German scientists Ernst Ruska and Max Knoll in 1931.With the TEM, it was finally possible to view things at the molecular level. Studies were made of the proteins that make up the human body. Metals were also studied. The TEM made all of this possible by focusing a beam of electrons to pass through an object, rather than by focusing light on the object as was done with traditional microscopes. Particles smaller than 200 nm were able to be viewed.